A Small Taste of the Archives

CPatwVMWgAAwDoYFollowing our previous exhibition of artworks and archive materials relating to our first two Heritage Lottery funded projects, we have used some of the exhibition space here at Kirkby Library to display a small selection of the archive documents that have been digitised as a result of our Heritage Lottery grant.

Our three year Heritage Lottery grant has allowed us to develop the community engagement side of our work: facilitating nine projects that relate to different aspects of our archive collections and will be planned and delivered in partnership with a diverse range of Knowsley’s communities. Alongside this, we are in the process of creating an online catalogue and digitising a large portion of our collections. The nine items currently on display are part of this digitisation programme.

The display highlights documents from the 14th to the 20th century, covering different aspects of Knowsley’s history and the people who have lived and worked here.

Included is a 1715 list of taxes collected from Tarbock land-owners that provides antax collection thumbnail
example of local Catholics (or ‘Papists’ as they are referred to) having to pay twice as much as other rate-payers. This includes the Catholic at the head of the list, the Right Honourable Lord Molyneux.

The little-known Kirkby Amateur Dramatics Society are represented with a scan from their home-made 1935-36 photo album, chronicling the construction of sets for their plays and the performances themselves. The members have added a charming touch to the album by selecting quotes from the plays they staged to caption the photographs.

As with so many repositories, Knowsley Archives has a significant number of Bastardy Bonds. On display is an order from 1734 identifying one Richard Quick of Halewood as the father of Tarbock resident Ann Wyke’s unborn child and ordering him to pay towards the upbringing of the child.

huyton reel thumbnailAnother less well-known item in our collection we are drawing attention to is a music book handwritten and compiled at some point in the mid-19th century by a surveyor in Huyton called Thomas Watkin. The book is a beautiful document put together with real love and care and provides a fascinating glimpse into the folk tunes that ordinary people living in the area may have been listening and dancing along to.

Whilst only a small display, we hope this temporary exhibition will give visitors a hint of the diversity of our collections and encourage people to come and ask us questions and view some of the original documents.